Blog

Blog

November 17, 2019
VIDEO: Ecological Impacts of Overuse in the Adirondacks
New York’s Adirondack Park is a world-class conservation achievement.  It was created in 1892 by New York State. It contains six-million acres, and is the largest park in the contiguous United States. The Adirondacks are protected “Forever Wild” under Article XIV of the New York State Constitution. This means that the public land is constitutionally protected from being sold or leased by the state. 
November 14, 2019  |  by: Julia Goren - Adirondack Council Director of the Vision Project
5 Lessons from the Northeastern Alpine Stewardship Gathering
At the end of October, New York State was privileged to host the Northeastern Alpine Stewardship Gathering, the premier conference for alpine stewards, land managers, trail workers, researchers, and volunteers. For two and a half days, experts from across the Northeast discussed management challenges in threatened alpine habitats throughout the region.
November 5, 2019  |  by: Guest Author, Brendan Wiltse - Science & Stewardship Director for the Ausable River Association
What's in Our Backcountry Waters?
Guest Author, Brendan Wiltse Science & Stewardship Director for the Ausable River Association, discusses the potential water quality impacts of recreational use in the High Peaks Wilderness Area.
October 30, 2019  |  by: Casey Marvell - Adirondack Council's Policy Fellow
5 Things You Need to Know | ADK Conservation News
Adirondack Conservation News is a collection of the most current events taking place in New York’s Adirondack Park, a unique national treasure and legacy we inherited over 100 years ago, that we must to protect for future generations. Adirondack Conservation News aims to highlight both threats and opportunities concerning the Park’s ecological integrity, wild character and community vibrancy.
October 18, 2019  |  by: Lisa M. Genier - Adirondack Council Program Analyst
About the Common Loon
Loons. We all love them. We all get a thrill when we see a loon or hear their haunting cries. A bit of  research further expanded my appreciation for these creatures I have enjoyed my entire life. Here’s what I learned about this great symbol of wilderness.
October 2, 2019  |  by: Casey Marvell - Adirondack Council's Policy Fellow
5 Things You Need to Know | September ADK Conservation News
Adirondack Conservation News is a collection of the most current events taking place in New York’s Adirondack Park, a unique national treasure and legacy we inherited over 100 years ago, that we must to protect for future generations. Adirondack Conservation News aims to highlight both threats and opportunities concerning the Park’s ecological integrity, wild character and community vibrancy.
September 20, 2019  |  by: Mary Godnick - Adirondack Council Marketing and Communications Associate
5 Things You Can Do to Be A Better Advocate for the Adirondacks on Social Media
As part of the Leave No Trace Hot Spot event in the High Peaks, a select group gathered at the Adirondack Mountain Club's Heart Lake Program Center for a training with staff from the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics and a discussion around how social media affects recreational impacts in the Adirondacks.
September 11, 2019  |  by: Lizzie Fainberg - Essex Farm Institute Rural Law Fellow
Climate Change and Agriculture in the Adirondacks
As the effects of climate change become more pronounced globally and across the nation, climate leaders have been working toward identifying the prominent causes of, and potential solutions to, this international problem. Agriculture has long been identified as a major source of greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change. However, certain agricultural practices, such as cover cropping, sustainable forestry, and attention to soil health can help transform agriculture from part of the problem into part of the solution.
September 4, 2019  |  by: Julia Randall - Adirondack Council's Clarence Petty Intern
Wild Thoughts  Part III -  Why Wilderness?
Wild Thoughts is a three-part blog series on wilderness ethics and management written in anticipation of the 2020 Adirondack Wilderness Symposium. Organized in part by Adirondack Council, the Symposium (dates TBD) will be open to the public and will feature programming on such varied topics as the legal status of wilderness in New York State, wilderness management in the era of climate change, and the more intangible, philosophical character of wilderness. Similarly, each segment of this summer-long blog series will tackle a different, broad wilderness-related question. Together, the Symposium and this series will attempt to offer a comprehensive, 21st-century consideration of wilderness as a legal concept, an ecological condition, and a cultural phenomenon.
August 29, 2019  |  by: Casey Marvell - Adirondack Council's Policy Fellow
5 Things You Need to Know | August 2019 ADK Conservation News
Adirondack Conservation News is a collection of the most current events taking place in New York’s Adirondack Park, a unique national treasure and legacy we inherited over 100 years ago, that we must to protect for future generations. Adirondack Conservation News aims to highlight both threats and opportunities concerning the Park’s ecological integrity, wild character and community vibrancy.

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