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The Adirondacks Depend on You for Clean Water

By: Kevin Chlad - Adirondack Council Director of Government Relations
Monday, December 16, 2019

Water is the lifeblood of the Adirondacks. Wild mountain lakes and ponds throughout the Park provide critical habitats for wildlife. Communities and homeowners alike depend on clean lakes, streams, and groundwater for their drinking water. Businesses rely on abundant, clean water for tourism and recreation.

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Adirondack waters are threatened by aquatic invasive species, outdated wastewater infrastructure, over-application of road salt for winter maintenance, acid rain, impacts of climate change, failing septic systems, and even overuse by well-meaning outdoor enthusiasts. 

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Every year, Lawmakers assemble at the New York State Capitol between January and June to approve a budget and pass legislation that impacts our Adirondack Legacy. The Adirondack Council and partners work every day to ensure that our Park’s waters are kept clean for current and future generations, but we cannot do it alone. We need your help. Get involved today by contacting your elected officials, and supporting our work. Every bit of effort makes a difference. Click HERE for our latest action alert.

Thank you, and Happy Holidays.

 
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Kevin Chlad joined the Adirondack Council staff in 2011. He leads the Council’s Albany-based Government Relations team, building coalitions and lobbying government officials to improve protection and grow funding for the Adirondack Park.

Kevin graduated in 2008 with a degree in Environmental Studies of the Adirondacks from SUNY Potsdam. Kevin was a Council Clarence Petty Intern in 2009, and has held numerous other Adirondack occupations, including Ausable River Steward, canoe guide, and fire tower summit steward. When not advocating for the Park, Kevin can be found on the golf course, deep in the wilderness, or clinging to the occasional rock face or hanging from an icicle drip.

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